2015 Int’ Journal of Press/Politics Conference

IJPPI’m proud to present the 2015 International Journal of Press/Politics Conference, hosted September 17-18 by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford.

The full program including abstracts is here [PDF], and an overview with titles and presenters is below–we will be covering many issues relevant for the International Journal of Press/Politic‘s mission: to advance our understanding of the relations between news media and politics in a global perspective.

With more than 60 researchers from over 20 countries, it will be a truly international event and it is one I really look forward to–a good start to what I plan as an annual event, with the best and most relevant papers submitted to the journal for later publication.

2015 International Journal of Press/Politics Conference

THURSDAY THE 17TH

Keynote by Frank Esser: 9.00 – 10.30

Panels 1a and 1b 10.45 – 12.15

Panel 1a: Protest, Activism, and Civil Society

Chaired by Katrin Voltmer

Prospective journalism redux: The new life of political magazines in the digital age Francisco Seoane Pérez, University of Castilla-La Mancha

Experiential Learning, Standby Citizens and the Redundancy of Slacktivism: Exploring the Day-to-Day Use of Social Media for Political Participation. James Dennis, Royal Holloway, University of London

The engineering of dissent: How international NGOs use digital tools to craft oppositional politics. Matthew Powers, University of Washington – Seattle

We doth protest too much, methinks (perhaps): Does the concept of the ‘protest paradigm’ truly capture the predominant features of the reporting of protest? Ian Taylor, University of Leicester

Panel 1b: Comparing Media Systems and Cross-National Influences

Chaired by Paolo Mancini

Media influence upon Global South development institutions. Felipe Rodrigues Siston, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)

Comparing Defective Media Systems in Southeast Asia. Melanie Radue, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg

Critical and multiperspectival investigation in political news coverage: Is Mediterranean journalism better than its reputation? Edda Humprecht and Frank Esser, University of Zurich

The Impact of Trust in the News on Online News Interaction in 11 Countries. Richard Fletcher, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford and Sora Park, University of Canberra

Panels 2a and 2b 13.00 – 14.30

Panel 2a: Contentious Politics and Media Audiences in Transitional Societies (I)

Chaired by William Porath

Contested transitions: Journalistic interpretations of democracy in Egypt and South Africa. Katrin Voltmer and Hendrik Kraetzschmar, University of Leeds

The Ripple Effects of International Broadcasting: How Activists Interpret the Role of International Broadcasting in the Egyptian and Syrian Protests. Ben O’Loughlin and Billur Aslan, Royal Holloway, University of London

Volatile Politics and the Dynamics of Media Audiences: A Longitudinal Study of News Consumption in Egypt. Nael Jebril, Bournemouth University

New Politics of News Circulation and Reception in Turkey. Suncem Koçer, Kadir Has University, Istanbul

Panel 2b: Media Logic, Crises, and Strategy

Chaired by Ralph Schroeder

News Media Logic on the Shift. How new media actors shape the printed news. Maria Karidi and Michael Meyen, University of Munich

Comparing Reactions to News Aggregators´ Practices. Sarah Anne Ganter, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford

Values Priming and Press Performance: How Media Crises Activate Latent Attitudes and Shape News Evaluations. Erik P. Bucy, Texas Tech University and Paul D’Angelo, The College of New Jersey

Execution as a Strategic Tool: Fear and Legitimisation in ISIS Media Agenda-Setting. Andrew Barr and Alexandra Herfroy-Mischler, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Birds of a feather sessions: 15.00 – 16.00

Panels 3a and 3b 16.30-18.00

Panel 3a: Digital Media and Changing Patterns of News Consumption

Chaired by Michaela Maier

Rethinking Digital Media and Political Change. Ralph Schroeder, University of Oxford

The Ubiquitous Bigfoot and the new Digital Audiences: Contesting negotiations in the literate networked publics in India. Vibodh Parthasarathi, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi; Ananda Mitra, Wake Forest University, and Sanjay Mamani, Redinfi LLC

The History of Social Sharing of News. Jonathan Bright and Scott Hale, University of Oxford

GlobalCOM. Juan Luis Manfredi-Sánchez, University of Castilla-La Mancha

Panel 3b: Journalists, News Media, and the State (I)

Chaired by Jesper Strömback

Relations between political actors and journalists: Media instrumentalization in Serbia. Ana Milojević and Aleksandra Krstić, University of Belgrade

Press Offices and Political Parallelism in Spain. Links Between the Professionalisation and Increase of Political Control of the Media. Andreu Casero-Ripollés and Pablo López-Rabadán, Universitat Jaume I, Spain

Corollaries of relations between political actors and journalists on journalism and democracy in Nigeria. Rodney Ciboh, Benue State University, Nigeria

In the shadow of state power: Citizenship rights, civil society and media representation in China, 1978 – 2012. Na Liu, Sichuan University and Tsan-Kuo Chang, City University of Hong Kong

FRIDAY THE 18TH

Panels 4a and 4b 9.00 – 10.30

Panel 4a: Agenda-Setting and Social Issues

Chaired by Bilge Yesil

Taking News at Face Value? The Effect of Deserving and Undeserving Exemplars in News Coverage of Welfare State Reform. Christian Elmelund-Præstekær and Morten Skovsgaard, University of Southern Denmark

Poverty Discourse in the United States, 2004-2014. Lori Young, University of Pennsylvania

The Schizophrenic Mass Media: Contingencies of Coverage of Welfare State Reforms. Morten Skovsgaard and Christian Elmelund-Præstekær, University of Southern Denmark

African Newspaper Coverage of AIDS: Comparing New Models of Press-State Relations and Structural Factors in Sub-Saharan Anglophone Africa. John C. Pollock, D’Angelo, Paul, Burd, Amanda, Kiernicki, Kristen, and Janna Raudenbush, The College of New Jersey

Panel 4b: Journalists, News Media, and the State (II)

Chaired by Frank Esser

How the national context and presumed media influence shape the orientations of political actors towards news media: Evidence from four European contexts. Peter Maurer, University of Vienna

Why the media matters for politicians. A study on the strategic use of mass media in lawmaking. Lotte Melenhorst, Leiden University and Peter Van Aelst, University of Antwerp

Governmental communication in the wake of mediatization. Magnus Fredriksson, University of Gothenburg and Josef Pallas, Uppsala University

Between media and political power: perceptions of government intermediaries caught in the cross-field. Ruth Garland, LSE

Panels 5a and 5b 10.45 – 12.15

Panel 5a: Contentious Politics and Media Audiences in Transitional Societies (II)

Chaired by John Pollock

Corruption in the press coverage: Audience segmentation and the lack of shared indignation. Paolo Mancini, Marco Mazzoni, Alessio Cornia and Rita Marchetti, Università di Perugia

Is populism the hegemonic political communication style of the 21st century? The impossible cases of Hugo Chávez and Nigel Farage. Ralph Negrine, University of Sheffield and Elena Block, University of Queensland

Press and Politics in a Neoliberal Islamist State: The Case of Turkey. Bilge Yesil, City University of New York

From Contentious Moments to Everyday Politics of Mundaneness – Researching digital media and contentious politics in China. Jun Liu, University of Copenhagen

Panel 5b: Media Freedom, Professionalism, and Accountability

Chaired by Raymond Kuhn

“It’s so cool what we’ve created here”: How the fact-checking movement became international. Lucas Graves, University of Wisconsin

New professionals for a new genre. Freelance journalists in China’s public debate. Emma Lupano, Università degli Studi di Milano

Negotiating tolerance: Freedom of expression, secularism, and contemporary political communication. Charlotte Elliott, University of Leeds

Doing International Politics Under Domestic Public Pressure – A Model of the Relationship between Public Opinion, Published Opinion and Political Decision-Making in an International Context. Christina Köhler and Philipp Weichselbaum, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz

Panels 6a and 6b 13.00 – 14.30

Panel 6a: Campaigns and the Democratic Process

Chaired by Ralph Negrine

Political Parties’ and Media’s Interplay in Politicizing EU Integration: A six-country analysis of party communication and media coverage in the 2014 EP election campaigns. Michaela Maier and Melanie Leidecker, University of Koblenz-Landau; Silke Adam and Beatrice Eugster, University of Bern

Media and the Mobilizing Effects of Election Campaigns – Comparing Election Campaigns to the National and European Parliament. Jesper Strömbäck, Gothenburg University and Adam Shehata, Gothenburg University

Televised debates in parliamentary democracies. Nick Anstead, LSE

Cross-Media Strategies in Online Petition Campaigning. David Kapf, George Washington University

Panel 6b: Politicized Individuals

Chaired by Jay Blumler

The mediatization of presidential leadership in France. Raymond Kuhn, Queen Mary University of London

Three types of political personalisation in the press and in political advertising during election campaigns: Chile 1970 – 2009. William Porath, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and Dr. Juan-Cristóbal Portales, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez

From the Presidential Spouse to the First Lady – how have the media created a new political actor? A comparative study of the political rise of the First Lady in France, Spain, Poland and the US. Ewa Widlak, University Pompeu Fabra

“Hands Up, Don’t Shoot”: A Comparative News Analysis of the Michael Brown’s Shooting in Four Countries. Suman Mishra and Elza Ibroscheva, Southern Illinois University

Roundtable with IJPP Editorial Board Members 15.00 – 16.00

Closing remarks 16.00-16.15

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